So here we are, wrapping up our first of four weeks in Montréal. Honestly we were not quite sure what to expect once we got here. All I am going to say is we are having a wonderful time. The people have been incredibly friendly and helpful. As well, the architecture and history are fantastic. As you can see above we checked out the sight of the 1967 World Expo. The dome is a great landmark for a lovely park and obviously an impressive facility for holding festivals and events.

There are churches everywhere and not small ones. St. Joseph’s Oratory is the largest church in Canada. Founded in 1904, it is the highest building in Montréal. However for me it was a bit of a let down. Huge, yes, but not a lot of finesse. It just overpowers with shear mass.
The organ in St. Joseph’s Oratory is one of the ten most prestigious organs in the world. Unfortunately we did not get a chance to hear it. It is by far the most impressive feature in the basilica.
One of the things Montréal is proud of is having hosted the only Summer Olympic Games in Canada. The pool was beautiful, well used and wonderfully maintained. We also had an opportunity to walk by the rowing facility on Notre Dame Island and it also appeared to be well maintained.
We have seen a couple of churches that have been closed off and become the victim of graffiti. Rather a sad thing to observe. I must admit I was thrilled to see a good use for a church that had been mothballed. The Place Delacroix has been converted into 70 condominiums and a common use facility. A pretty cool place to call home.

We utilized our transit passes and headed north to check out little Italy. What a find. Originally we were heading there to see the Jean-Talon Market. It was good, but what was better was the restaurant we found for lunch.

Part of the flower section of the Jean-Talon Market. Spring is the time for plants and there was no lack of them here.
So far we have not been overwhelmed with street art but what we have seen has been quite good.
While we were enjoying an awesome walking tour in the Old Port, our guide Christen pointed out a wonderful bit of history. When the British were in power they had built this column with the figure of Lord Nelson atop it. Instead of whining and demanding that it be ripped down, the locals respected history and erected a statue in honour of one of their heroes immediately opposite Lord Nelson. It makes for a wonderful bit of history if you know to look for it.

The hot spring weather is making it very easy to have a great first impression of Montréal. In addition to the architecture and history there are also restaurants and patios on nearly every corner which allow for fantastic people watching. We are also loving being able to venture to any corner of the city on the transit system, which is the best one we have encountered in Canada so far.

Welcome to our travel blog. Have you ever wondered what it would be like to say, "I'm out of here?" Well we did, and in 2013 we made it a reality. We sold or gave away all of our possessions other than what fit in our luggage and we set off on an endless adventure. Part of our goal is to share our experiences with others and hopefully provide some information, motivation, or just a moments escape. The general idea was to look for a place that would be ideal to settle down in. However in the meantime it is about experiencing life in different countries amongst different cultures and learning how to understand and appreciate each other. A large part of our time is spent housesitting which provides an excellent opportunity to experience more of the "normal" neighbourhoods as opposed to the tourist locales. Though we make sure to enjoy those as well. So through plenty of photographs and a running commentary come and share with us our life on the road.

3 comments on “Montréal, Canada

  1. Kevin Pattison

    Dam sure beats the wind of the coast.
    Looks like a place to put on the visit list !

  2. make sure you eat lots of bagels, have a shop at Adonis, and eat at Avesta on St. Catherine’s for me.

Leave a Reply to Helga Pepneck-Joyce Cancel reply

%d bloggers like this: